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This post is to let the class and the blogosphere know that I am still alive and working on our non-profit project. Jade and I wrote up a draft of our assessment and strategic plan for the New Sudanese Community Association. You can find our Google Doc here:

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1DwJq0FSr34pYa-pE_zXdrP_m3bCNom0MoEprD7aSTjc/edit#

We went ahead and met with Abraham, the executive director of NSCA, on Friday morning to see what he thought of our project and also to gain access to the website (we got the password the next day!). Abraham and his associate, Daniel Lual, seemed happy about the ideas. They said that they’d have to run the project past the Board of Directors next Saturday, but didn’t see any reason why it wouldn’t pass, especially since we can start up a WordPress site (our idea) for free, and still give them all the features they had hoped we’d be able to do.

I chose to examine the non-profit WordPress site of Wiser, which helps to promote education for girls in Kenya. This site definitely looks like something Jade and I could make (I hope…haha). The website has–like the sites Dr. Brooks showed–a changing banner of pictures and texts that includes statistics and information about the organization. The NSCA has a lot of beautiful pictures, and Jade and I have discovered that the top third of a website is a crucial spot for visual engagement, so we’ll likely try to get a similar shifting banner and text.

This is one of the many sharp and engaging photos on the current NSCA website.

This is one of the many sharp and engaging pictures on the current NSCA website.

I’m not sure how much I like the background, which is kind of a somber dusty brown. I think it might be good to keep the bright and colorful color scheme of NSCA’s original website–and that’s something to think about for other groups re-making the website: how much should change and how much should stay the same? Additionally, Wiser’s WordPress has a bar on top of the banner with  more information about the organization, news and updates, programs, and “support Wiser.” Fortunately, Abraham spelled out much of what he’d like the website to look like, so Jade and I don’t have to start from total “scratch.”

Wiser has short blogs linked to the main page when the user scrolls down–they update about once a month. Hopefully we will be able to foster an interactive atmosphere for NSCA on WordPress, but the best we can hope for is to create a space online for it to potentially happen. One thing that Wiser ought to have done more of is their “categories” and “tags.” They only have about one each. As far as I know, this is a crucial way to connect and network with other people.

This appears to be the official logo for NSCA (we'll have to make sure there's no copyright on it). Wiser's logo is simply their name with a tree in the place of the "I". Theirs seems effective because it is their name, but I think the most important thing is going to be consistency.

This appears to be the official logo for NSCA (we’ll have tomake sure there’s no copyright on it). Wiser’s logo is there name with a tree taking the place of the “I”. Theirs seems effective because it has their name, but I think the most important thing is going to be consistency.

There was only one small video I could find on Wiser’s site. Jade and I have been speculating whether or not we would want to interview one of the members of NSCA. We do know that they have at least a couple videos, one covering the referendum to make South Sudan an independent country. One thing to think about is who the site is targeting. Like I’ve said before, Abraham doesn’t have a hard time staying in contact with the Sudanese community, so we might want to cater a bit more to those with no foreknowledge about the group or Sudan.

Lastly, the Wiser site has no external resources (despite having a “resource” page). This might be another great way to “cross-promote” with other organizations.

Alright, that’s it for now! Look for more to come as Jade and I begin to implement our plan and await approval…I’m optimistic.

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